Author Archives: awpc editor

Plea to Environment Minister, Tasmania, to end the lethal “culls” of Wombats!

A235,_Ballarat_Wildlife_Park,_Ballarat,_Australia,_wombats,_2007

Dear Environment  Minister Matthew Groom, I am writing as the Secretary of the Australian Wildlife Protection Council, an lobby organisation in operation since 1969 as a advocate for native animals. (image: Minister Matthew Groom) We are pleading and imploring that you to put a 12-month stay on culling healthy wombats, and then a permanent policy,  with the provision that farmers

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Koala habitat being cleared, mined and “developed”, with impotent environmental protection laws

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Almost all the Australians are aware of the Koalas existence and they associate Koalas as one of the most native animals. We consider Koalas to be one of the national symbols of Australia, along with Kangaroos.  They are iconic animals. The koala is featured in the Dreamtime stories and mythology of indigenous Australians. The Tharawal people believed that the animal

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The Lazarus Project- to bring back Australia’s southern gastric-brooding frog

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Scientists from The Lazarus Project – named for the biblical Lazarus of Bethany brought back to life by Jesus and not the decidedly average 2008 Paul Walker movie – are trying to restore Australia’s southern gastric-brooding frog. The gastric-brooding frogs (Rheobatrachus) were a genus of ground-dwelling frogs native to Queensland in eastern Australia. The genus consisted of only two species,

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End the deliberate carnage of our Victorian waterbirds- called a “sport”

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810 birds, including 68 endangered freckled ducks, were shot and left to die on Victorian wetlands on the opening weekend of the duck shooting season. These dead birds were left outside Premier Daniel Andrew’s office. Australia’s rarest waterfowl, the Freckled Duck breeds in swamps in inland Australia.  The Freckled Duck may be easily confused with the Pacific Black Duck, Anas superciliosa, and

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The resurgence of the ill-fated Brush-tailed Rock Wallaby- Grampians

ToorongaConservation

In 1999, the last surviving rock-wallaby was captured and a breeding program was launched.  A small colony was introduced in to the park in 2008, but high mortality and low reproduction rates have disappointed the recovery program team for the last decade. The good news is that the colony now boasts eight wallabies, including four offspring.  Some of the offspring

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