Author Archives: Chris Lehmann

UPDATE: AWPC supports Kinley Estate (VIC) residents in fight for kangaroo lives

kinley-estate-media-release-aug2020
Lilydale-update-thumbnailThe Herald Sun update, week ending 7 August 2020

[CLICK IMAGE TO ENLARGE]


Are we Kind? …
Or are we Monsters?

Today [Tuesday 4 August 2020] could be D-DAY for the Kinley Estate (at Lilydale, Vic) kangaroos.

WE ARE CALLING on DELWP [Department of Environment, Land, Water and Planning], and the Minister Lily D’Ambrosio, to take a humane and reasonable approach by supporting relocation of the Kinley Estate kangaroos.

The small mob (~40) of kangaroos that have lived peacefully together, and much loved by the locals, are slated to be killed to make way for development of the Kinley Estate(Lilydale) by INTRAPAC Property.

Any reasonable, humane person looks at the situation and asks — “what about relocating them?”

Wildlife experts are adamant that relocation of the mob can be done successfully with minimal stress.

That knowing comes from deep experience of rescue, rehabilitation and dealing with a wide variety of situations where kangaroos find themselves needing help. In addition, there are successful mob relocations (*).

DELWP fails our kangaroos, and the public in 2 major ways.

First, they claim that 40% will die when relocated. That has been proven wildly wrong, more than once, by people in the field (**).

Second, their own guidelines stress the need to attempt all non-lethal means of solving problems ahead of reverting to the bullet. Did they do that? No they did not even try. They did not enter discussions with those who are willing and able to manage a relocation.

The developer wanted to use relocation, but DELWP does not support any such humane outcome.

The Black Summer loss of wildlife should, at a minimum, cause a rethink of the old ways.

Australians, and the local community, want more for our iconic kangaroos. Andy Meddick (AJP) has a capable team ready to act.

If DELWP supports the kill option over relocation, then we (humans) really are monsters. (***)

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(*)  About 4 years ago, approximately 100 kangaroos were relocated successfully from a Wildlife Fauna Park in Victoria.

In 2017, more than 200 kangaroos were successfully relocated at Bathurst.

(**)  If relocation fails it is due to mishandling and lack of suitable skills.

(***)  DELWP claims that culling (killing) is the most humane option; BUT it is not possible to cull kangaroos in a humane manner. Shooting and killing a mob of kangaroos is extremely distressing to the tight family bonds among the animals. That is why they live in mobs, they know each other and have familial and friendship bonds. Joeys will suffer extremely in any cull because the at foot joeys are separated from their mothers and the pouch joeys are torn from the pouch and bludgeoned to death.

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FURTHER INFORMATION:

Chris Lehmann, Save the Kinley Estate Kangaroos

Australian Wildlife Protection Council Inc.
PO Box 302, Bungendore NSW 2621
M: 0434 479 459
ABN 85 240 279 616
Patron: Hon Peter Singer


RELATED STORY:  The Agile Project wins approval for nation’s largest relocation of wallabies after three-year battle

 

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Sometimes sad and unfair things happen (Vic)

wombat-ill-treatment-Chris-Lehmann

I HAVE BEEN TREATING this wombat for sarcoptic mange since early June. The 2nd major treatment was yesterday afternoon, when myself and the local landowners were enjoying seeing the improved condition and alertness of this animal. She was definitely on the road back to normal.

Julie, who is the landowner, contacted me this afternoon because she found our dear wombat dead on the grass. Someone had deliberately run over her while she was eating grass. The tyre tracks are pretty obvious.

— Chris Lehmann, Facebook post. 23 July 2020

 

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Three days at a border fireground (Vic, NSW)

corryong-fire-grounds

AWPC committee member and long-time wildlife rescuer Chris Lehmann spent three days on the post-fire ground between between Victoria and NSW around Albury and Corryong in early February.  Here is his first hand initial report and also a youtube clip from that journey.

The new AWPC committee supports all community efforts to help bring emergency assistance, including food and water drops, to fire survivors as well as to areas that are so dry that animals have lost their natural sustenance (and that might burn next!)

State governments in Victoria and NSW have yet to take leadership or action on helping the wildlife survivors bar a few well-publiced food drops to endangered wallabies.

Landholders and the wider community, including volunteers from overseas are leading the way with generosity and dedication.


My first expression of what I saw at Corryong:

Longing for life

We spent 3 days in the fire grounds of Corryong, some 30 days after Corryong was evacuated because of the fire storms that had destroyed Woormargama, Burrowa, Pine, and Mittamatite Forests plus much of the farmland and many homes around.

We were searching for life.

Mt Mittamatite is a local mountain forest covering about 100 square kms. There might have been 100,000+ furred and feathered animals living on just Mt Mittamatite. Now, 30 days later, as a result of daily searches (over the last few weeks) well into the early hours of the morning, a local wildlife carer estimates there is 50–100 animals surviving there.

He has identified the very few patches of forest that have enough cover and dregs of food for survival and has committed to providing water and food for those few survivors. Those 50–100 kangaroos, wallabies and wombats will be the genesis of the recovery of the mountain.

Life is there, we found it — but the lack of water and good food is too real.

We need to support these animals for a few months. On Tuesday we [sent] 30–40 bags of carrots up to Bellaboo Wildlife Shelter who will lead the water station and food drop effort.

 


A 2nd report from the Corryong Fire Grounds, February 2020.

(Click above text to link to the written post on the Kangaloola Wildlife Shelter Inc. Facebook page.)

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